Tag Archives: customer experience

Are your customers happy?

Are your customers happy?

Happy customers are the very best way to market your business. Happy customers will tell their friends, their colleagues and their family about you. Word of mouth marketing, is still the one number way to promote your business. A study from Nielsen in 2011 stated that 92% of people will trust a personal recommendation, that far outstrips the next most trusted source, which is consumer opinions posted online, coming in at 70%

So how do you make sure that people are recommending you? Firstly deliver a great service. Secondly keep an eye on feedback. Just because your customers aren’t complaining, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are happy.

For example, say you have an IT issue. The first time it happens you go to your IT support company and they fix it. The second time it happens you go to your IT support company and they fix it. But the third or fourth time, you are fed up of the problem, so you try and fix it yourself, so simply work around the problem. This is known as complaint fatigue.

The problem with complaint fatigue is that as a company it can be hard to spot. But you may notice it in a drop-off of recommendations. As those customers struggling with complaint fatigue will no longer recommend you to their friends and family.

Are you confident that your business is producing good word of mouth marketing, or would you like to try and improve it? With our Marketing Manager service we deliver consistent marketing for an affordable budget, and we can talk to your customers for you to get honest feedback to help you build your business.

Click below to watch the video, or call us on 0121 2225743 for a confidential conversation about your business.

 

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Aardvark Marketing | All that glitters is not gold

All that glitters is not gold

All that glitters is not gold

You have probably noticed that Shakespeare is getting a lot of airtime at the moment, as the 400th anniversary of his death is commemorated.  Probably influenced by all the events, articles and TV programmes, when I heard a news story earlier this week I was transported back in time to my school days when I studied The Merchant of Venice and this particular quotation.  The literary purists amongst you will have noted that I have used the more modern version, the original form uses “glisters” rather than “glitters”, but I’m sure that the Bard would be OK with a touch of modernisation.
So what was the news story?  It was about Birmingham City Council’s children’s services (click here for the BBC story), which are deemed to have made insufficient improvement, and are therefore to be run by a trust instead.  The external commissioner found “significant improvements” but that more was needed.  However, the council will “retain control of design, delivery and the trust itself”.  Now, I don’t want to get into a debate about the details of the story and certainly not the politics of it all, but it does rather feel to me that the change is a bit superficial, hoping that a ‘rebranding’ will change the performance.
The City Council wouldn’t be the first to try a rebrand to fix a problem with their product or service and I’m sure we can all think of a few others.  I just don’t think it’s the right solution.  If the product or service isn’t meeting requirements, then that’s what needs fixing, not the name, logo, colours, stationery etc.
When the product or service has been fixed or is well on the way, it’s often then a question of perception and reality.  In general, perception lags reality, so it takes time for reputation to catch up with real performance, whether that be improving or declining.  Brand image is built of many elements, but over time, customer experience is almost always the most important.  It’s really hard, if not impossible to create a strong brand if the product doesn’t deliver.  The opposite isn’t necessarily true, but a competent marketer should be able to build a good brand if the product is good.
One of my favourite examples of how to do it properly is Skoda.  Around 25 years ago, the brand was quite literally a joke, with a reputation for poor design, engineering and build quality.  “How do you double the value of a Skoda?  Fill the fuel tank” typified public perceptions of the brand.
Over time, Volkswagen, the new partner, worked on the product and then when they had something to be proud of, started to address the issues with the image.  You may remember some of their advertising; challenging us to revisit our now out of date perceptions with a nicely judged self-deprecating humour that accepted the low base they were starting from.  Now Skoda is a well-respected brand, representing a smart choice, with a tag-line of ‘Simply Clever’.  If they had tried to move to this brand image in the early 1990s it would have lacked credibility and almost certainly would have disappeared without trace.
Chris.

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Aardvark Marketing | Lies are like cockroaches

Lies are like cockroaches

Lies are like cockroaches

It used to be “the cheque is in the post”, but with the near demise of cheques and the adoption of electronic communication, that’s something we rarely hear in 2016.  What I do hear is “your call is important to us” or “due to unprecedented demand, all our call handlers are busy”.  Really?
I might believe it the first time, but if this happens regularly, at different times of day and is clearly an automated system, I’m going to doubt the sincerity behind those words.  One of our clients really value their customers so highly they routinely over-man their customer service team and have designated deputy account managers for each customer so they are hardly ever unable to speak immediately to someone who can help them.
It might only be a slight untruth, or even a white lie, but it does matter, because lies are like cockroaches – once I spot one I’m expecting there to be more!  I’m now viewing and listening to everything you communicate with a sceptical eye or ear, undermining all the hard work and money you have invested in crafting those messages and getting me to notice them.
In an era where trust in the establishment is undermined on a regular basis (think MP’s expenses, FIFA, drug abuse in athletics …), businesses and brands need to be more careful than ever to maintain complete integrity in dealing with customers.
And the damage doesn’t stop there.  Unintentionally, you’ve modelled the wrong behaviour to all your team too.  If it’s OK to tell lies to customers about how important they are, then where else and to whom is it acceptable to mislead, hide the truth or fib?  It’s a slippery slope that leads ultimately to falsifying emissions tests, overstating profits or writing our own 5-star testimonials.
Even the smallest untruths are nibbling away at your brand reputation, and ultimately you’ll probably get found out!
Chris.

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